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RCM Writers's articles
Article
Essay Series: What I Love About Gaming, Part 4
Jul 13th 2016
This summer, the RCM Writing department started its first Summer Writing program with four college interns from around the US. One of their first assignments was to write an op-ed essay on what they love about gaming. Evee's essay is the final installment in this four-part series.

Video Games: The Future of Story-Telling
Article
Essay Series: What I Love About Gaming, Part 3
Jul 6th 2016
This summer, the RCM Writing department started its first Summer Writing program with four college interns from around the US. One of their first assignments was to write an op-ed essay on what they love about gaming. Ray's essay is the third installment in this four-part series.

I was a gamer until school became more serious and time-consuming.
Article
Essay Series: What I Love About Gaming, Part 2
Jun 29th 2016
This summer, the RCM Writing department started its first Summer Writing program with four college interns from around the US. One of their first assignments was to write an op-ed essay on what they love about gaming. Ruby Re's essay is the second installment in this four-part series.

To be perfectly honest, I never thought I would be a gamer.
Article
Essay Series: What I Love About Gaming, Part 1
Jun 22nd 2016
This summer, the RCM Writing department started its first Summer Writing program with four college interns from around the US. One of their first assignments was to write an op-ed essay on what they love about gaming. Barrtender's essay is the first installment in this four-part series.
It's hard to say exactly what got me into Dragon Age. I'd always been a fan of more casual games in the past (Legend of Zelda, Kirby, and the quintessential childhood favorite, Pokemon), so the jump from the cartoony fun of the Nintendo classics to the politics driven world of Thedas was an odd one. I actually had Origins sitting in my Origins library for nearly a year before even bothering to play it; they'd had a free download deal somewhere along the line, and I decided to grab it just because I could.
And man, was I sorry that I had waited.
Article
Sims Update Opens New Possibilities
Jun 17th 2016
I have always really loved The Sims. I enjoy how much creativity players are allowed when creating their virtual world and one of its most important aspects of this freedom is character design. Recently, the game released an update that allows for more options for character design. After choosing whether the character is male or female, players now have the ability to access all of the character design aspects for either characters, including clothing, accessories, and different hairstyles. In their news statement, Maxis stated, "The Sims is made by a diverse team for a diverse audience, and it's really important to us that players are able to be creative and express themselves through our games. We want to make sure players can create characters they can identify with or relate to through powerful tools that give them influence over a Sims gender, age, ethnicity, body type and more."
Personally, I think this was a great decision. Identity in gaming can be made up of a lot of factors. When I am designing my characters, I either design them to represent me as I am or as who I would like to be. For some players, their characters have no representation of their identity, and for others, their characters are who they really are, even if it is not what their outward appearance appears to be. This is where this update is really nice. It continues to give flexibility to the players, allowing them to put as many aspects of themselves into their characters as they would like. For people who do not identify as their culturally assigned gender, this update would allow them to create a character to represent who they are. Or, if a player is more gender fluid, it would give them the opportunity to combine whatever masculine or feminine identity traits they see fit. It is now up to the players to determine how immersed they would like to be in their virtual world with their characters. As the video included in the article states, "Create Who You Want."
I would like to see more games adopt this style of character creation. However, I do recognize that in some games, character creation may not be that important. For example, I am currently playing Destiny. From my perspective, my character is really awesome, and I particularly love the mohawk that I chose for her. Yet, I am the only one who can see this; all of the other online players only see my character in her armor, which makes me pretty disappointed. I prefer to be more immersed in my gaming experiences; therefore I would enjoy having more options to make my character whoever I wanted them to be. For games that rely more heavily on a storyline, these character design features may also be less important. Either way, it will be interesting to see how the gaming community overall reacts to this update, and I am looking forward to seeing some of the many characters that will be created as a result.
Article
[Op-Ed] On "A Price of Games Journalism"
Dec 8th 2015
Note: The title of this op-ed has been altered from its initial title this morning to reflect that of the Kotaku editorial to which it is a response.
After The Rival Cast's episode 129 discussion on Kotaku's blacklisting by Ubisoft and Bethesda, I decided it's about time to finally get back to writing. If you've not listened to the episode, I recommend checking it out. Both arguments were interesting, but towards the end, I think both sides had some gaps I intend to fill. It was my intention to post this last week, but the holidays meant time was not adequate to work on a well-reasoned argument for both sides.
Before we continue, be aware that I have a bias against the current state of many games journalism sites. I'm not alone in this, and in a September 21, 2015 board meeting of the Society of Professional Journalists, Region 3 director Mike Koretzky described the state of video games journalism (after talking to both the journalists and their detractors) as currently being in a state similar to where music journalism was in the 60s. Quite frankly, I think an industry that gaming market research organization Newzoo projects will make 91.5 billion USD in worldwide revenue by the end of this year deserves better.